On Talent

 
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It can be hard to recognize our own talents. Whenever I had to play that ice-breaker game as a kid, I dreaded my turn to introduce myself, as I believed I didn’t have any. I wasn’t a singer, or a dancer, or an actress. I didn’t play an instrument (very well), or lead my sports teams to victories. I was boring. Average. Mediocre at everything. A master of none. .

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Time, growing up, and growing into myself has taught me that talents needn’t be externally visible. Often our talents cannot be readily detected, by others or even by ourselves. Our talents are what we know best, whatever that may be. We just don’t recognize it as talent because it comes so easily to us. We assume it comes easily to everyone. .

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But if the greatest musicians assumed we all knew how to sing and write, they wouldn’t bother to share their songs. If the greatest chefs assumed we all knew how to cook, they wouldn’t open up 5 star restaurants. And if the greatest authors assumed we all knew how to write stories, they wouldn’t bring us the novels we pour ourselves into on the train to work. Your talent is your knowledge, and no one can share that with the world but you. .

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